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Arch Iran Med. 2013;16(4): 0-0.
PMID: 23496362
Scopus ID: 84875352995
  Abstract View: 686
  PDF Download: 508

Original Article

Are the Serum Biomarkers Pepsinogen I and II Good Predictors for the Detection of Subjects with Atrophic Gastritis in Areas that have Different Gastric Cancer Incidence?

Ashraf Mohamadkhani, Sodaif Darvish Moghaddam, Hassan Salmanroghani, Amin Allafsghari, Abbas Yazdanbod, Mahboobeh Mirzaei, Arghavan Haj-sheykholeslami, Jafar Bashiri, Alireza Sadjadi, Sadegh Massarrat *

Abstract

 BACKGROUND: Northern Iran (Ardabil) is characterized by a high gastric cancer (GC) rate, whereas Southern Iran (Kerman and Yazd) has a low GC rate. The aim of this study is to verify the potential for pepsinogen I and II to detect atrophic gastritis (AG) in both high and low risk populations for GC.

METHODS: Sera of blood donors and patients with GC from Ardebil, Kerman and Yazd were used to measure levels of pepsinogen I, II and H. pylori IgG antibody. GC rates in these cities were determined according to the Cancer Registry and upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy results. 
RESULTS: There were 449 subjects with an average age of 45 ± 15 years. The GC rate in the endoscopy units of the hospital in Ardabil was four times higher than Kerman or Yazd. The mean serum pepsinogen I levels did not differ between Ardabil (102 ± 42.6 µg/mL), Kerman (103.3 ± 49.8 µg/mL), and Yazd (111.7 ± 39 µg/mL). Pepsinogen II levels were: 8.1 ± 4.7 µg/mL (Ardabil), 7.5 ± 5.3 µg/mL (Kerman), and 7.6 ± 4.4 µg/mL (Yazd), which were not different. The H. pylori infection rates were: Ardabil (61%), Kerman (55%), and Yazd (73%). A low ratio of pepsinogen I to II (≤3) was seen in Ardabil (1.3%), Kerman (1.9%), and Yazd (0.0%), which was not significant. A total of 51.9% of GC patients from Ardabil had normal pepsinogen I (≥70 µg/mL) levels and pepsinogen I/II ratios that were >5. 
CONCLUSION: Serum biomarkers pepsinogen I and II and their ratios are probably not sensitive predictors of AG in areas that have either a high or low GC prevalence. This finding is likely related to the lack of an association between GC and advanced AG.  
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